Stintino, the Fornelli Straits and Capo Caccia

In the Med, although we are on a sailboat, we are often motor sailing. Usually because there isn’t enough wind, there is too much wind or the wind is coming from where you are going, otherwise known as Rules of the Med.

Thursday’s sail from Castelsardo to Stintino, was a ripper.  The sun was shining and we departed the marina. We were saying goodbye to the Citadel and the breeze filled in to the NE.  This was very reminiscent of  an old fashioned Sydney North Easter.

James and Donald had the spinnaker out ‘tout suite’. Swanno was on the bow feeding the spinnaker out of the bag, Sue and I were in the pit and we were pulling it up. Suddenly, we see Swanno lurch, then the spinnaker pulling him over the side of the boat. He pulled himself and the spinnaker back in – sigh of relief from the pit and the captain. Swanno’s balance tested and he won gold. Very happy not to have a man overboard exercise in Sardinia.

Under spinnaker
Under spinnaker

We arrived at Stintino, a small fishing village and went for a small walk around the marinas and through the town. We had a lovely dinner as we listened to the church bells ring out Ave Maria.

Overlooking Stintino Harbour
Overlooking Stintino Harbour

We left very early the next morning, in very light winds and motored through the Fornelli Straits. The water was like glass and you could look down 3 metres and see weed and sea cucumbers through the aqua water. The water was crystal clear, the sky was blue, the sun was out.  On the passage, dolphins came and said hello and then continued on their way. But there were more surprises ahead.

Sighting Capo Caccia, a marine reserve one hour west of Alghero, we are surprised at how tall and how beautiful this majestic limestone promontory is . Capo Caccia is a striking vision as you approach it from the sea. We slowed to look at an excursion boat seemingly stuck in a cave entrance.  Then rounded this 186 metre towering headland and found the sun shining, azure waters and the water was 20.3C.   The water was warming up, so we stopped the boat and most of the crew had a magnificent swim.

Cappo Caccia
Cappo Caccia

In the cliffs, there were small holes that the wind had created. We saw pigeons flying in and out. We could also view swallows, large gulls and a peregrine falcon. A fleet of kayakers came by in their red kayaks and yellow vests gliding right next to the dive boat where everyone was dressed in black.

Donald & Kayaker at Cappo Caccio
Donald & Kayakers at Cappo Caccio

Eventually it was time to head into the fortress city of Alghero, and a wander through the old fortress, the markets and of course the hunt for the wonderful gelato.

Sue, James & Donald on the rampart overlooking Alghero Harbour
Sue, James & Donald on the rampart overlooking Alghero Harbour

Tonight is Sue and Swannos last night and we have a wonderful meal and then back to Mercier to celebrate the 150 miles we have sailed together over the past week.  It has been so much fun. Same time next year?